Posts Tagged ‘windowing’

Global TV-Series Release Strategy Has To Change

January 21, 2009

TV stations in Germany have to notice that audience ratings of “blockbuster” TV Series like Lost are constantly not as high as years before, the German newspaper Süddeutsche reports.

A reason for this could be seen in the huge delay of release dates in the German market compared to the US releases. Often series were brought months later to the German market like in the example Lost, where the latest season started 12 months later.

Of course this incentives the fans to get their shows somewhere online, which obviously lowers the demand and “hype” about a free TV release months later. “The dark market” for streaming online services is getting better and better and many episodes have  even German subtitles just a few days after the U.S. release. A study of the research company tfactory shows that more than 50% between 15 and 25 years old are watching TV series online now. So also the awareness for illegal alternatives is rising.

I´m surprised that this discussion didn´t start earlier. Obviously the usage of mostly illegal web TV streaming websites are rising to a critical mass.

The strategy of production companies and TV stations is probably to wait how the series perform in the US key market before selling it to the global market in order to minimize their risks. But in my opinion, like in the movie industry, the global release has to be simultaneously in the future. The TV companies must react and have to change there release windowing strategy for the global market. Synchronizing issues can´t be an excuse.

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Is Ubiquity After Scarcity The New Way To Make Money?

October 10, 2008

Paul Sweeting had a good note on this yesterday at DMW:

“Is scarcity still a viable foundation for a business model for content owners? For most of their histories, movie and TV studios relied on a strategy of limited distribution to extract maximum value from their works. Movies were released through a carefully ordered sequence of exclusive windows defined by distribution channel (theaters, DVD, pay-TV, broadcast); network TV series didn’t enter the broader syndication market for three or four years after their debut, assuming the series lasted that long. In each case, the relative scarcity of the content provided the content owner with maximum pricing power. Since the advent of digital platforms, however, ubiquity has become the name of the game, challenging content owners’ pricing power and business models.”

And I fully agree. In a time where we have no control over distribution anymore, where we get networked, where every user is potentially their “own distribution channel”… in a time where we are talking about the Attention Economy… scarcity makes no sense anymore for digital media products.
We must realize: Attention is the scarcity now, not (even good) content anymore.
And immediately publishing your content for free on your own website, like NBC is doing on Hulu, would be just the first step.

Content syndication could be a very important thing in the future. Get your content in the “pole position”, make cooperations, go there where the traffic is and make your content available… and as a content owner, maybe you market your potential ad inventory yourself and the platform owner gets the content (with the attached ads) for free.

A minute attention is a minute attention is a minute attention is a minute attenion… you will be able to capitalize this attention, wherever you get it…
It`s one of this famous good old Google priniciples: Focus on products that draw users and money will follow…

People won`t automatically go to the place, where they would get the content legally, even if it`s there for free… people go where they can get it first, where they can see it first. Most users don`t care about whether it`s legal or not. The Radiohead “In Rainbows” example shows exactly this. There were far more “illegal” torrent downloads than downloads on the Radiohead website. Even though every kid knew, cause of the media hype, that there is a free legal alternative…
So… try to go where the traffic is.