Posts Tagged ‘content distribution’

Access is better than ownership!

January 22, 2009

kevinkelly

Again a remarkable blog post by Kevin Kelly. In his text titled “Better than owning” Kevin calls the Internet the “magic rental store” and asks: “If you lived inside of the world’s largest rental store, why would you own anything?”
We are on a way to the “Age of Access” i fully agree.

Here are some quotes of his best arguments:

“The request to enjoy a work is thus separated from the more complicated choice of whether I want to “own” it. I can consume a movie, music or book without having to decide or follow up on ownership.”

(…)

“For many people this type of instant universal access is better than owning. No responsibility of care, backing up, sorting, cataloging, cleaning, or storage.  As they gain in public accessibility, books, music and movies are headed to become social goods even though they might not be paid by taxes.”

(…)

“Our sense of ownership is a funny thing. If you purchase an ebook and download the book’s PDF file to your computer, you’d say you owned it, and expect the rights of ownership. However if you went to a link where a PDF of a book was opened on your screen for free and automatically, you might not feel you owned this book, even if it was copied to your disk. Possession of a copy turns out to be less important in the feeling of ownership than does the price. Free things don’t generate strong feelings of ownership. Gifts do, which we think of as “free,” but our sense of ownership is related to their “replacement costs” – how much they would cost us to buy elsewhere, their market value. If an item has a marketplace cost of zero, we tend not to feel we own it. So as more economic activity gravitates toward the free, less will feel owned. As more is shared, less will act like property.”

(…)

“The downside to the traditional rental business is the “rival” nature of physical goods. Rival means that there is a zero-sum game; only one rival prevails. If I am renting your boat, no one else can. (…) But of course, intangible goods and services don’t work this way. They are “non-rival” which means you can rent the same movie to as many people who want to rent it this hour. Sharing intangibles scales magnificently. This ability to share on a large scale without diminishing the satisfaction of the individual renter is transformative. The total cost of use drops precipitously (shared by millions instead of one). Suddenly, ownership is not so important.  Why own, when you get the same utility from renting, leasing, licensing, sharing?”

Advertisements

Is Ubiquity After Scarcity The New Way To Make Money?

October 10, 2008

Paul Sweeting had a good note on this yesterday at DMW:

“Is scarcity still a viable foundation for a business model for content owners? For most of their histories, movie and TV studios relied on a strategy of limited distribution to extract maximum value from their works. Movies were released through a carefully ordered sequence of exclusive windows defined by distribution channel (theaters, DVD, pay-TV, broadcast); network TV series didn’t enter the broader syndication market for three or four years after their debut, assuming the series lasted that long. In each case, the relative scarcity of the content provided the content owner with maximum pricing power. Since the advent of digital platforms, however, ubiquity has become the name of the game, challenging content owners’ pricing power and business models.”

And I fully agree. In a time where we have no control over distribution anymore, where we get networked, where every user is potentially their “own distribution channel”… in a time where we are talking about the Attention Economy… scarcity makes no sense anymore for digital media products.
We must realize: Attention is the scarcity now, not (even good) content anymore.
And immediately publishing your content for free on your own website, like NBC is doing on Hulu, would be just the first step.

Content syndication could be a very important thing in the future. Get your content in the “pole position”, make cooperations, go there where the traffic is and make your content available… and as a content owner, maybe you market your potential ad inventory yourself and the platform owner gets the content (with the attached ads) for free.

A minute attention is a minute attention is a minute attention is a minute attenion… you will be able to capitalize this attention, wherever you get it…
It`s one of this famous good old Google priniciples: Focus on products that draw users and money will follow…

People won`t automatically go to the place, where they would get the content legally, even if it`s there for free… people go where they can get it first, where they can see it first. Most users don`t care about whether it`s legal or not. The Radiohead “In Rainbows” example shows exactly this. There were far more “illegal” torrent downloads than downloads on the Radiohead website. Even though every kid knew, cause of the media hype, that there is a free legal alternative…
So… try to go where the traffic is.