Archive for the 'distribution' Category

Nine Inch Nails Case Study

February 5, 2009

Last year the name Nine Inch Nails or Trent Reznor was mentioned a lot, when someone was talking about the future of music marketing. Trent has developed a complete new way for music marketing using the whole potential of web 2.0.
He demonstrated on how many ways you can connect with fans and how you still can give your fans a reason to buy in the digital age. There is more than MySpace, there is more than just giving your songs away for free in hope the audience comes to your live shows.
Mike Masnick was summarizing the NIN Campaign in his presentation given to MidemNet this year.

Cloud Computing is more of a Reality than we think…

October 28, 2008

I was just thinking again about this post from Kevin Kelly a few days ago. This whole scenario about cloud computing sounds a bit “Science Fiction”… but actually it isn`t …
Even Microsoft is starting a big PR campaign now around it`s new platform Windows Azure… ” the future is cloud computing”…. so it`s going mainstream, although most internet users are still unaware of the term “cloud computing.” They are already taking advantage of it more than they know.

When we talk about cloud computing we mean an architecture by which data and applications reside in cyberspace, allowing users to access them through any web-connected device. This includes: webmail services like Hotmail or Gmail; personal photo storage services like Flickr; online applications like Google Docs and Photoshop Express; video storeage and publishing services like Youtube; blogging platforms like WordPress; social bookmarking sites like Delicious; social networks like Facebook; and of course online servers where you can backup your harddrive or any other personal files..

The PEW Research Center published in September 2008 a study stating that 69 % of all Internet users have either stored data online or used a web-based software application. If you think of the list examples above, you would think it would be even more…

… and it should be just a matter of time for people to accept that cloud computing is superior to desktop applications in all areas of software or media usage and so the hardware industry will respond on it with new devices. Mobile device of all kinds will profit a lot from this developement.

Of course people have many concerns about cloud computing like security and privacy, but there will be some solutions to give the users a “safe feeling”. …  anyway, this will be a big challenge.

So cloud computing is coming fast… what does this mean for the media industry?
A lot especially for the business models. In a cloud computing world, “owning” content is not a thing you will think about anymore, since that was part of the physical media world. You will just desire access to content. That´s all you need. So the cloud computing system and all it`s advantages for the users will push the developement to “The Age of Access“.  Ad supported content will be huge, especially cause of the big opportunities in personalized advertising. Cloud computing is the perfect and most efficient environment for personalized advertising. Social communities and social production will be more efficient than ever before. And that`s just the obvious stuff. If you read the post by Kevin Kelly you will find many more ideas for all parts of the media industry and how it will change in a certain area. I will try to do more research on this stuff…

Is Ubiquity After Scarcity The New Way To Make Money?

October 10, 2008

Paul Sweeting had a good note on this yesterday at DMW:

“Is scarcity still a viable foundation for a business model for content owners? For most of their histories, movie and TV studios relied on a strategy of limited distribution to extract maximum value from their works. Movies were released through a carefully ordered sequence of exclusive windows defined by distribution channel (theaters, DVD, pay-TV, broadcast); network TV series didn’t enter the broader syndication market for three or four years after their debut, assuming the series lasted that long. In each case, the relative scarcity of the content provided the content owner with maximum pricing power. Since the advent of digital platforms, however, ubiquity has become the name of the game, challenging content owners’ pricing power and business models.”

And I fully agree. In a time where we have no control over distribution anymore, where we get networked, where every user is potentially their “own distribution channel”… in a time where we are talking about the Attention Economy… scarcity makes no sense anymore for digital media products.
We must realize: Attention is the scarcity now, not (even good) content anymore.
And immediately publishing your content for free on your own website, like NBC is doing on Hulu, would be just the first step.

Content syndication could be a very important thing in the future. Get your content in the “pole position”, make cooperations, go there where the traffic is and make your content available… and as a content owner, maybe you market your potential ad inventory yourself and the platform owner gets the content (with the attached ads) for free.

A minute attention is a minute attention is a minute attention is a minute attenion… you will be able to capitalize this attention, wherever you get it…
It`s one of this famous good old Google priniciples: Focus on products that draw users and money will follow…

People won`t automatically go to the place, where they would get the content legally, even if it`s there for free… people go where they can get it first, where they can see it first. Most users don`t care about whether it`s legal or not. The Radiohead “In Rainbows” example shows exactly this. There were far more “illegal” torrent downloads than downloads on the Radiohead website. Even though every kid knew, cause of the media hype, that there is a free legal alternative…
So… try to go where the traffic is.

Joost Goes Browser

September 18, 2008

Today Joost released a browser version of it`s p2p service (just a plug-in download is needed). Next month, according to CEO Mike Volpi to TechChrunch, Joost will offer a version of the service that doesn’t require any download at all.

In addition to the browser version, they created a video based social network complete with Facebook-style activity streams that show your friends what content you are watching and gives you the chance of commenting or “shouting” about the program (Watch the Demo Video of TechCrunch below.).

TV is and always has been a “social experience” and so I think there is big potential in these features. Imagine watching a soccer game with all your mates… even when you are in a hotel on the other side of the world…

So Joost goes a little bit in the direction of what Last.Fm does for music….  integrating “social” components… there is only a good recommendation system missing … maybe coming soon … and of course, the biggest problem of all,  the “big blockbuster” content is missing. Last.Fm made it cause they lived in the “grey” area of copyright usage… Joost is in the green area… and there is no chance to compete… it’s too expensive to finance great video content with full copyrights … we will see…

But anyway, I think this model is a very interesting perspective for the television industry…

Vodpod videos no longer available.

People Love Their DVR

September 15, 2008

Just found this survey via DMW of 1,000 DVR owners in the U.S., U.K., Italy and Australia conducted by NDS.

The survey shows how many people like non linear content usage. More than 70% of DVR owners say they cannot live without it. Owners ranked the DVR as the second-most essential household technology item, behind the mobile phone.

I don´t know how good the quality of the study is, but anyway… Non-linear content usage will be the biggest driver for people to change to web TV as soon as technology is ready. HD or quality is not as important than this chance to finally personalize your TV watching.

It´s sad that non-linear content usage is still not mainstream. People sitting in front of TV and complaining about the programme… they don´t have to…

Roland Berger Web TV Study

September 6, 2008

(Click to enlarge)

This study was released a few weeks ago and is really worth reading. It is published by Roland Berger Consulting and is titeled “WebTV insights and perspectives – A web 2.0 phenomenon is coining new TV usage patterns

Very useful for all of you who need some inspiration for questions like… What is behind the current WebTV drive? Who is watching WebTV and how can the audience be monetized? Is it a temporary phenomenon or will WebTV establish itself as a real alternative to “traditional” TV and IPTV?

In short, some key findings of the study:

– WebTV is a mainstream online application and plays a key role in web entertainment.
– The WebTV audience is commercially very attractive if you are able to target a niche market.
– While UGC is still far from drowning, premium content offerings are on the rise.
– The majority of WebTV offers will probably remain free in the future.
– Web TV will quickly move to mobile devices.
– Through new devices WebTV is becoming an integral part of the living room entertainment sphere.
– WebTV will benefit from differentiating factors like interactivity, on-demand accessibility, as well as extensive communication and personalization features.
– WebTV is likely to converge with IPTV in the long run.
– Operators and traditional media companies must react now in order to keep WebTV companies from establishing their brands in the minds of the consumers.

For me, one  important insight of the study is that users, and particularly teens, use WebTV servicesas a form of social interaction. As a consequence, more and more large online communities grow around the basic content services. So the context (like social interaction, or editorial information) of TV content or Web TV services will get a very important “intangible” feature to differentiate from competitors.

The Unlimited Free Jukebox In Your Pocket

July 19, 2008

A dream a few years ago… and now we are nearer than we think.

Just found this Mediaweek article:

“Internet radio upstart Pandora has streamed 3.3 million songs to iPhone users since the launch of its new mobile application, making it the third most popular such app for the red-hot device”

Using a data flat rate on the iPhone, you can enjoy all the big music streaming platforms (not just Pandora, Last.Fm works already too – see the userinterface in the pic) for free…

Well, not  everybody has an iPhone or something equivalent in his pocket yet… but soon.

Accenture Content Study – IPTV

July 17, 2008

Just read the new Accenture global content study 2008 ” The Challenge of Change: Perspectives of the Future for Content Providers“.

Well, there is nothing surprisingly new… but here are the key findings:

  • About 63 percent of companies are pursuing a multi-platform distribution strategy.
  • More than one-third of companies expect to see significant revenues from social media and user-generated content within three years.
  • About 84 percent of companies expect mobile rich media to become mass market, representing the largest growth opportunity for media and entertainment firms.
  • About 52 percent of those interviewed see digital advertising eclipsing traditional advertising within five years.

More interesting is an older Accenture article about IPTV – “Infinite possibilities” Television? (2006) – I found accidentally at their website. It has some worthwhile reading thoughts about the potential and possibilities of IPTV.